Letter to my MP

Following the advice of the BMA, I wrote to my MP today. The words flowed easily. My god, I feel guilty for leaving and pursuing another career while my colleagues are left in this pile of shit, but I’ll be damned before I stop fighting for them – for us – for everyone.

Dear Ms Creasy,

I am writing to you regarding the junior doctor contract.

I am a ex-doctor. I worked for the NHS for two and a half years before leaving in December 2015. During my time as a doctor, I experienced the extreme pressures that medical staff find themselves under.

I did part of my training in Paediatrics, and I found it especially difficult not to be able to deliver the highest level of care to sick babies and children because we were constantly faced with staff shortages, a lack of resources and management decisions that were not based on good clinical practice, but were simply target-driven, cost-cutting exercises.

My health deteriorated physically and mentally while I worked as a junior doctor. Nowadays, doctors do not have access to the same facilities as they did in days gone by. No accommodation or parking is usually provided for junior doctors, so I often found myself walking home or to wherever my car was in the middle of the night after shifts. As a woman, this can be an incredibly intimidating thing to do – especially since junior doctors have to move around the country so much, so I was sometimes not familiar with the area I was working in.

Food and drink is not provided for medical staff any more, and I often found myself going through shifts without a moment to eat or drink anything. I fainted on shift a couple of times because of it.

Even in the short time I worked as a doctor, I saw and fought against the closure of ‘Doctors’ Messes’ – staff rooms that were often the only place in the hospital to rest, eat and sleep. I worked in several hospitals where I was doing night shifts without any sleeping provisions. If I ever did get a couple of hours to rest, I was expected to either sleep on the floor of an office or try to fashion a bed out of wheely chairs.

When I tell people my stories, they are shocked. I am not the sort of person who demands luxury at every turn, but the denial of basic human needs in the workplace seems absolutely absurd, given that these are the people who need to be able to make snap decisions literally about life or death.

I have been shocked and appalled by the way this issue has been handled by the government. The lies, deceit, spin and slander have completely destroyed any confidence the profession had in the Health Secretary, and the idea of imposition of a contract against the will of 98% of junior doctors, and without soliciting atheir input, is surely akin to exploitation.

I implore you to demand the answers from them that they have denied us. Jeremy Hunt has consistently claimed that doctors will not be working more hours, but how on earth can he simultaneously propose to increase the service to seven days a week without increasing staff numbers or budget? It just does not add up.

I can honestly tell you I am relieved not to be working as a doctor anymore, and my health has finally returned. Although my former colleagues truly love their jobs, I fear this contract will push more and more of them over the edge and soon there will be more like me.

We need people like you to speak on our behalf and put sustained pressure on the Health Secretary and Prime Minister. If this contract is successfully imposed, I believe the future of the NHS will be in jeopardy.

Yours faithfully,

Dr Priyanjalee Perera
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